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Home » Patient FAQs

Patient FAQs

We want to make sure that you receive all of the information that you need to make educated decisions about your eye health. Dr. Hiten Prajapati is always available to answer your questions. Please feel free to send us your eye care questions to hiten@trieyecare.com

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Q: Why do my Polarized sunglasses need anti-reflective coatings?
A: Anti-reflective coating on a sun lens is used to prevent backside reflections. This eliminates annoying reflections that occur when light is reflected off the lens surface of the lens. This can interfere with or decrease the effectiveness of the polarized lenses. This treatment is only beneficial on the backside of the lens, especially so that you won't see the reflection of your eye in the lens. Since AR increases light transmission it is a disadvantage on the front of a sunlens. (On a clear lens AR is used to increase light transmission) Also, Usually on Backside A/R is used due to the fact that fingerprints and dirt are more visible on a polarized dark surface that has A/R. You can see smudges very easily. The same goes for any Sun Tinted lens.

Q: I woke up with a red eye, but it’s not painful. Should I wait a few days or have it seen right away?
A: It is always a good idea to come to see our eye doctor to make sure if it is something threatening to your vision, but most often red eyes that aren’t painful could be due to subconjunctival hemorrhages or viral infections. Subconjunctival hemorrhages look like small pools of blood on the whites of the eyes which are harmless if only confined to the outside of the eye; however, could be vision threatening if also on the inside of the eye. We would suggest you come in for an emergency appointment so that our eye doctor can make sure what the problem really is and treat if necessary.

Q: Why do my eyes water all the time? What can I do to make it stop?
A: Although it seems counterintuitive, watering is a sign of dry eye disease. When the eyes are dry a signal is sent to the brain to trigger tearing. In order to stop the eyes from tearing we need to treat the dryness. There are many lifestyle factors that contribute to dry eye disease. For example, while watching television, using a computer or reading we are so fixated on the task at hand that we do not blink as often as we should and the tear film evaporates and leaves our cornea exposed to the air. Another example is spending time near a fan or in front of an air vent; this too can cause our tear film to dry up quickly. While there are several more reasons for dry eye disease to occur, the good news is that it can be treated. There are several drops, medications, and home remedies that can be used and your optometrist can help to determine the treatment plan that is right for your type of dry eye disease.

Q: At what age should I bring my child in for her first eye exam? And how much does it cost?
A: The Canadian Association of Optometrists recommends that the first eye exam be done at the age of 6 months, then next around the age of 3, and then yearly thereafter. Your Optometrist may recommend more frequent eye exams if he or she has something they want to monitor more closely. As for the cost; luckily, in Alberta (and many other Provinces in Canada), ALL children’s eye exams are covered by Alberta Health Care up until the child’s 19th birthday. It’s not just “once per year” either; a child can come in as often as necessary and Alberta Health Care will cover it.

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